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The origins of the Honor Journey has its roots in a very inspirational Native American dance troupe, DEER CHASER, comprised of Lakota youth from Pine Ridge Reservation. DEER CHASER and Honor Journey Staff have collaborated in the past organizing and directing two Native American Earth Rhythm events in Pennsylvania as well as numerous Indigenous Awareness Programs at schools, universities, and with radio and TV interviews from 1998-2002. The children of the DEER CHASER Dance Troupe have been a great influence in the staff's desire to educate people regarding the issues that Native Americans face today.

The formation of the Honor Journey model has been shaped after a successful project called "The Rising Nation Journey," in which the Honor Journey staff served as key organizers. The first Rising Nation Journey was a 330-mile canoe journey in August 2002 that took place from the top of the Delaware River in Hancock, NY to Cape May NJ. The goal of the Rising Nation Journey was to create awareness regarding the Lena'pe clans (Wolf, Turkey, and Turtle), the original inhabitants and their long historical connection with the Delaware River corridor. The journey marked a new beginning of brotherhood between the Lena'pe Tribe and the people that neighbor the river. Throughout the 2002 journey, respected Lena'pe individuals carried wampum as a traditional symbolic treaty from the Lena'pe Tribe to the people of Pennsylvania. A Treaty of Brotherhood, signed between "The People" and the Lena'pe Tribe, took place to celebrate this time of historical significance. Representatives of the tribe and various environmental organizations, historical societies, churches, schools, and universities signed the first documentation. Those parties signing made a commitment to actively preserve, protect, and honor the Lena'pe Tribe.

The treaty is renewed every four years, with those groups and organizations wishing to recommit or to commit for the first time to the Lena'pe Tribe, thus the Treaty of Brotherhood is a living treaty. In 2006, the Lena'pe Tribe and its supporters again made an extensive journey down the Delaware River. Twenty-one organizations and individuals signed the 2006 Treaty.

"A society that cannot remember its past and honor it is in peril of losing its soul."
--Vine Deloria, Jr., Member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of Fort Yates, North Da
kota.



HOME | HONOUR FIJI JOURNEY | SACRED WATERS HONOR JOURNEY | SUSQUEHANNA RIVER HONOR JOURNEY
INDIGENOUS DIGNITY | STATEMENT OF NEED | PARTNERS | HISTORY | PHOTO GALLERY | CONTACT